Author Topic: ice dispenser  (Read 1550 times)

Offline diyguy

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ice dispenser
« on: February 18, 2009, 12:30:49 PM »
I have a ignorant but simple question...should there be continuity between the solenoid terminals of an ice dispenser?

Offline Icehouse

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Re: ice dispenser
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2009, 06:27:22 PM »
I have a ignorant but simple question...should there be continuity between the solenoid terminals of an ice dispenser?
  :) The only "ignorant" question is the one not asked, otherwise how would one learn.  O0
The answer is yes.  :)
NATE, NCCER, PHCC,HVAC Certified Instructor
Member RSES, US Army Refrigeration Specialist(Retired), Former Refrigeration Teacher NYC Board of Ed.
a tragedy has happen to me : http://web.me.com/zenzoidman/Bobice/

Offline Repair-man

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Re: ice dispenser
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2009, 06:46:15 PM »
The answer is yes, but only if you set your meter to read the highest OHMs in hopes it picks up on the solenoid. I have noticed that some cheaper meters do not reflect the true reading if the resistance is very low. One would need to  know the value of the  solenoid that is being checked.

Most of them have the wattage stamped on the side, so using OHM s Law, you can calculate the resistance.

« Last Edit: February 18, 2009, 06:49:29 PM by Repair-man »
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Offline Icehouse

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Re: ice dispenser
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2009, 08:20:03 AM »
 :) I believe the question was about continuity.

What is Electrical Continuity?
   

   Continuity refers to being part of a complete or connected whole. In electrical applications, when an electrical circuit is capable of conducting current, it demonstrates electrical continuity. It is also said to be “closed,” because the circuit is complete. In the case of a light switch, for example, the circuit is closed and capable of conducting electricity when the switch is flipped to "on." The user can break the electrical continuity by flipping the switch to "off," opening the circuit and rendering it incapable of conducting electricity.

For consumers, the most obvious sign that there is an electrical continuity issue with their wiring is when plugged-in electrical devices fail to work. However, unintended breaks in electrical continuity can have more serious consequences, such as electrical fires or damage to electrical equipment, and therefore, it is recommended that all electrical wiring be kept in good working order and properly maintained.

A number of devices are manufactured to assist consumers in testing electrical continuity, ranging from multimeters, which have a wide range of additional applications, to simple electrical continuity testers that light up if electrical continuity is present. These devices use two electrical probes, which form a complete circuit when touched together. Consumers can test the device to ensure that it is working properly by turning it on and touching the probes together – the meter should read zero, or the indicator light should turn on, indicating a closed circuit. When the probes are not touching anything, the metered device will read infinity, showing that the circuit is open.

When testing a circuit for electrical continuity, consumers should first cut off power to the circuit by unplugging the device or turning off the main circuit breaker. Failure to do this may result in severe shock. To test for electrical continuity, turn on the testing device and place one probe at each pole or terminal of the circuit being tested. When testing a switch, for example, if the switch is in the "on" position, the reading should be close to zero, and when the switch is off, the reading should be infinity. A simpler continuity tester with an indicator light will be illuminated when the switch is on, and dark when it is not.
NATE, NCCER, PHCC,HVAC Certified Instructor
Member RSES, US Army Refrigeration Specialist(Retired), Former Refrigeration Teacher NYC Board of Ed.
a tragedy has happen to me : http://web.me.com/zenzoidman/Bobice/

 

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