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Appliance repair, a dying trade?

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whirlpooltech:
All the technicians I know are old guys that have been in the trade for years.

The few young ones I see start doing appliance repair don't stick around for more then a year or two.

Repair-man:

--- Quote ---The few young ones I see start doing appliance repair don't stick around for more then a year or two.

--- End quote ---

I can see how this might seem odd to you, but it makes perfect sense considering the changes in the industry these days. If you'll remember, back in the 70s and 80s when us "old guys" got started doing repairs, there were only 4 companies making appliances...GE, WP, Maytag ad Frigidaire.

Each of these companies had ONE style of washer, ONE style of dryer, etc. , and we all learned them because it was easy to keep up with. There was no solid state equipment to deal with, no advanced diagnostic capabilites required.

Now, you tell me what it's like today!....

The tech has to learn 30 or more different designs of machines, be able to diagnose complex electrical circuits and have an array  of specialty tools that would choke the average layperson. There is no real warranty on parts any more (90 days) and the public is generally frustrated with
 products which no longer perform for 10 years without breaking down. I think todays tech needs to study Psych 101 to even venture into the public realm these days.

The demands placed on a new technician working for a large servicer, such as Sears, are intolerable. What used to be a place that  most tech would call "a good place to work" has now become a  low-benefit, long-hours and thankless grindstone that few are able to stomach. It is for this reason that I and others like AJ have turned to helping the consumers directly with minor issues, thereby eliminating the corporate snakes from the picture. Most people would rather pay for good advice rather than wait 2 week for inept service. As we have demonstrated on these forums, none of this is rocket science...it just needs a little 'splainin.

Teaching an old dawg new tricks is a heck of a lot easier than teaching a new dawg old tricks and new ones besides...

JWWebster:
Maybe today's consumer will quit buying crappy built high tech expensive junk and wait on some of the old stuff to re-appear. If it was a washer that was ever the baddest to the bone it was the Old style GE with the boot over the tranny and the skinny splines the 4 hose pump with the basket filter. Now that was a sweet machine.

Repair-man:

--- Quote ---Maybe today's consumer will quit buying crappy built high tech expensive junk and wait on some of the old stuff to re-appear.
--- End quote ---

I've got some ocean-front property in Arizona...interested?

Icehouse:
The problem is twofold. First the guidance counselors at schools are not letting students know that this is an excellent field to enter, they are busy pushing everything.  >:(
The second part is our own fault. Why look at the knowledge we need to repair today's appliances and the salaries.
When I was still active in the field a large company who shall remain nameless offered me a position, only problem was the pay was half of what I was already making.  :tickedoff:
Another company said I had a lower credit score then is acceptable to work for them, caring more about that then my experience.  :( :(

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