365-Day Hassle Free Return Policy!  ·  AppliancePartsPros.com
Washer Parts  ·  Dryer Parts  ·  Refrigerator Parts  ·  Dishwasher Parts  ·  Range & Oven Parts  ·  All Appliance Parts 

Author Topic: repairing timers  (Read 287 times)

Offline nolazach

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Sep 2011
  • Posts: 406
repairing timers
« on: June 11, 2014, 10:44:55 AM »
Anyone here do it?  I got a dryer in last week and decided to open the timer up.  One cam had it's retaining snap broken and was causing me to get no power to the motor.  I just aligned the cam where it was supposed to go, then JB welded it in place.  Stronger than it was from the factory.


   
    I would stand behind it for a 180 warranty.


 
  I haven't tried a washer timer yet, but I know I have another broken dryer timer or two I can take a look at. 


Offline AJ

  • Technician
    Administrator
  • Member Since: Jun 2007
  • Posts: 9873
  • Country: us
    • ApplianceJunk.com - Appliance Repair
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2014, 11:12:33 AM »
What if down the road the timer you repaired instead of replacing cause some property damage?

Offline nolazach

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Sep 2011
  • Posts: 406
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2014, 11:53:30 AM »
how so?  The cams are in the same position they were before.  I don't see how that could cause serious damage down the line. 
   When you open these things up you see cheaply made plastic parts.  But it's obvious what each part does as far as contacts.  Most of the time you just have to free a contact. 
 
so you are saying what If it did something that made a cam send the heat input constantly?  Then the thermal would do it's job.  Or the limiter.
  But again the cam is in the same place as before.

   I haven't tried this on a washer yet, they are much more complicated.  But $100 vs gluing a part that snapped back together? 
 
  The only one I sold is in a dryer I sold with a 180 warranty so I guess I will see.

Offline AJ

  • Technician
    Administrator
  • Member Since: Jun 2007
  • Posts: 9873
  • Country: us
    • ApplianceJunk.com - Appliance Repair
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2014, 12:05:00 PM »
Just wondering. Use to try and file bad contacts on timers many years ago but tired of call backs.

Offline nolazach

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Sep 2011
  • Posts: 406
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2014, 12:23:00 PM »
when you file, I remeber hearing that you also want to slightly bend the contacts in the direction of their contact slightly to ensure they seat better.  But you have to watch it go through it's cycles with the cover off and also use a meter to make sure you have contacts when and where you need them.

     I took some pics, but meant to do a video.  I'll film the next one

Offline youthatswhy

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Apr 2012
  • Posts: 48
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2014, 01:04:43 AM »
I use to do that dryer timer repair all the time. I used gel superglue ...worked great..no callbacks..had to be defect with those timers. it was always last cam.
 cam retaining clip was make too small and thin...I think.

Offline nolazach

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Sep 2011
  • Posts: 406
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2014, 08:33:29 AM »
Yeah.  Since this thread I opened up some FSP timers and all had either the last cam off our just a bad timer motor.
I've also worked on some maytag timers and I can see how much better they are made.  Metal twice as thick, cans four times as thick. Better contacts.
    But this may be an alternative because many times when it's a bad timer the customer just decides it's too much to fix.

Offline youthatswhy

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Apr 2012
  • Posts: 48
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2014, 09:13:03 PM »
I agree,,alot customers don't have resourses like they use too...(extra money).. so I try and make it work...I provide a service.. .that they need...and trust..
and I don't mean that in bad way...I need them and they need me...I will never be money rich...hmm

Offline gregaguilar

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Jan 2012
  • Posts: 108
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2014, 10:40:32 AM »
You are a good hombre I have done this on dryer timers a lot and no probel and you are rite they become stronger than from factory. What i am trying now is the metal ones but cannot seem to keep the little part tight enough and i am using solder I will report I am thniking of using jb weld to hold it in place anyway it is going to be on the top outside of the timer

Offline andersenappliance

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Feb 2012
  • Posts: 776
  • Country: us
Re: repairing timers
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2014, 02:28:40 PM »
I've filed some points, and yes, it helps to bend it forward a bit.

never glued cams though.

Maybe I should try to mess with these some times.  But on the other hand, there are paying jobs out there for my time.

\_(ツ)_/


 

"Remember When" from Old timers like myself

Started by Wedgeman55

Replies: 30
Views: 475
Last post December 09, 2013, 10:07:00 PM
by theoldstoveguy
Repairing broken wires

Started by RAH52

Replies: 26
Views: 414
Last post December 10, 2014, 08:47:22 AM
by dab147315