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Author Topic: Will it ever become common for the average joe to 'print' their own parts?  (Read 3612 times)

Offline AJ

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Check this out?


http://www.instructables.com/id/One-Washing-Machine-Selector-Knob-to-end-all-Washi/


Sure not everyone is going to have the skills to correctly design a part, but what happens when the people that do have the skills start sharing what they created with everyone else?


Then all anyone needs is to download the file to their 3D printer and wait for the magic to happen.


Thoughts?

Offline AJ

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Offline AdirondackBob

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Very Cool!  A quick search looks like the Printers start about $2,000.00- $3,000.00 upwards of $8,000.00- $10,000.00.



 

Offline AJ

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Very Cool!  A quick search looks like the Printers start about $2,000.00- $3,000.00 upwards of $8,000.00- $10,000.00.

Yes, but I would bet they will come down in price sooner or later.


http://blog.123dapp.com/2013/10/get-a-discounted-3d-printer

You also have the option of sending your project off to be printed instead of printing it on your own 3D printer.

From what little I have read about it so far it takes 1-2 weeks for your project to be printed.

Depending on size, material used and how it's to be cut out, etc... you get a instant price quote when you submit your 3D project file. From there you can go back and change material used for your project or edit what ever else and submit it again for another instant price quote.

Check this out. You don't even have to start your project from scratch. You can snap some photos of a object and go from there.

http://www.123dapp.com/catch

I recall awhile back seeing a story on CNN about a guy printing the first 3D gun.
I had no idea this technology was so far along that guys like me had access to it online already.







 

Offline AJ

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Offline AJ

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I may have found a new hobby, lol...

http://www.instructables.com/group/123d/

Offline andersenappliance

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I've worked with these printers - at least the primitive, ancient neanderthal version of them. 

Our machine would glue thin sheets of paper, layer by layer, and cut them with the outline of the part, plus a grid pattern on the non-part.  After finishing all the layers, you'd pick off the non-part with a dental pick, leaving the part.  The resulting model felt basically like wood.  It was difficult to use for hollow objects because you could not get inside to pick out the hollow.

I would imagine that the newer printers would use some sort of polymer, and only lay it down where it needs to go.  I'm sure that there would need to be some sort of support matrix, but it would be removable through some better method than picking.

We also had primitive programs that could turn a photo into a 3-d image.  I'd discussed a business plan with a friend for making custom bobble-heads.  You could send a picture and we'd create a bobble-head of whoever it was.

I think that 3-d mapping would be relatively easy now.  I imagine a camera mounted like a microscope above a turn-table with precise measurements.  Place the item, snap a few pictures as it is rotated, and the software triangulates the images and turns it into a 3-d image in the computer.  That would be primitive, but would work.  I'm sure you can get better accuracy using sonar or x-rays, or some such.

The knob that the guy made is nifty, but the same effect could be made using a block, a drill, and a woodruff key.  Or, a set of vice-grips!  Anybody ever seen the "There, I fixed it!" site?

Offline AJ

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Our machine would glue thin sheets of paper, layer by layer, and cut them with the outline of the part, plus a grid pattern on the non-part.  After finishing all the layers, you'd pick off the non-part with a dental pick, leaving the part.  The resulting model felt basically like wood.  It was difficult to use for hollow objects because you could not get inside to pick out the hollow.


With http://www.123dapp.com/make you can slice up your 3d model and print out the shapes to use as template.
Then cut the shapes out of wood, cardboard or what have you. Then put the pieces together to create your 3d model.
Sounds a bit like what you had described doing.

I don't see myself getting a 3d printer anytime soon or cutting out a million cardboard shapes, but I find the software used to design the 3d models very interesting. If I comes up with something I ever want fabricated there are option to have someone else do the fabricating part for me.

Here is a item I come across the other day, http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1078864724/pocket-wrench?ref=live
I have had simular idea's like the pocket wrench myself, but never knew what steps to take to go from idea to a finished product that I could hold in my hand, but I do now. :)

Offline AJ

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Another small appliance parts someone created themselves.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:165055

Been playing around with http://www.123dapp.com/design
It don't take long to get the basics down after watching a few youtube videos.

Just for fun I got my calipers out and took some measurements on my screwpop screwdriver I had just received the other day.



Then I started dragging, dropping, entering my measurements and a few minutes later I come up with this..
http://www.123dapp.com/MyCorner/ApplianceJunk-20979281

Offline AJ

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Very Cool!  A quick search looks like the Printers start about $2,000.00- $3,000.00 upwards of $8,000.00- $10,000.00.


Fast forward a few years. :)

Prices are dropping!

You can now buy a 3d printer from Dremel for $1000

https://3dprinter.dremel.com/

I was really surprised to see Dremel in the 3D printer business. 
 

For a little more money you can get a Makerbot.

http://store.makerbot.com/replicator-mini

A few others 3d printers on Amazon are now less then $1000

Still a little out of my price range, but I can see myself buying one down the road if they get cheaper.

First I need to learn more about getting my idea's on the screen and ready for printing. I have given up on http://www.123dapp.com/design as it always needs a internet connection. A lot of times I'm trying to draw simple things it slows to a crawl. It would be fun to play around with the full version of AutoCAD but it's simply to costly for me.

I started researching 3D printing software again a few weeks ago and come across http://www.sketchup.com/

I remember playing around with SketchUp a few years ago when it was owned by Google. About three years ago Google sold it to http://www.trimble.com/

Now I don't have to worry about putting so much time into learning SketchUp only to have google drop it down the road like they have with some of there other products.

One of the best parts of learning to use SketchUp is they have a free version for guys like me that just want to learn how to use it for more or less as a hobby. Even the SketchUp Pro version at $695 is not out of reach unlike AutoCAD that cost thousands for a subscription! Why do so many software companies seem to be going the subscription route?

Been working my way through 3D Printing with SketchUp along with many other online resources for learning SketchUp and 3d printing.
The guys on the SketchUp forum have been one of my best resources ever! http://forums.sketchup.com/

I was looking at some of the places you can send your designs to for printing and I was surprised how cheap some things are to print.
https://www.shapeways.com/ and another http://www.thingiverse.com/

So that's what I have been doing with my free time in the evening for the last few weeks.

Maybe some day in the future there will not be so many NLA parts as you will be able to simply print your own. :)







 

 

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