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Heat pump performance in cold weather.

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jumptrout51:
To check your refrigerant charge on a R22 hp you would use the sucking port using your blue gauge.
Not the suction port on the primary service valve.
With the unit set for heat and running,the suction pressure would be equivalent to the outside ambient temperature plus or minus 3 degrees. EXAMPLE; 40 degree pressure outside temp would be 37-43 degrees.
That would be a good charge.
If variable is lower,add refrigerant.
Is this a orifice delivery system or a thermostat expansion valve?

jimbo6679:
Most older heat pumps would cease operating when ambient was down to 30.    New units have a wider operating range.

First, do you have your EPA card to touch R22?   They take a VERY dim view if you do not.  Do you have a recovery machine?      Don't take offense if you are up to speed....  I just throw this out for everyones info.
Now,  this is not shade tree mechanics, where you just shove a little R134 into your car and come back next summer.    "fiddling" with a heat pump will get you into uncharted trouble.   You need to have proper equipment, and based on the data plate and install manual for your unit, determine what the proper subcooling should be based on house temp and outdoor ambient.    Adjust charge IF NECESSARY.

lesguns:
ground source is the best for heat pumps but real expensive. try 1500w infared heaters for xtra aux. just a thought.

def:

--- Quote from: jimbo6679 on February 14, 2013, 08:35:25 PM ---Most older heat pumps would cease operating when ambient was down to 30.    New units have a wider operating range.

First, do you have your EPA card to touch R22?  No EPA thing but, I do have a valid passport They take a VERY dim view if you do not.  Do you have a recovery machine? No, but I do have one of those stair stepper machines that I exercise on every morning,      Don't take offense if you are up to speed....  I just throw this out for everyones info.
Now,  this is not shade tree mechanics, where you just shove a little R134 into your car and come back next summer. I usually just let system pressure suck the refrigerant into the low pressure port...I don't have to shove it.     "fiddling" with a heat pump will get you into uncharted trouble. You need to have proper equipment, and based on the data plate and install manual for your unit, determine what the proper subcooling should be based on house temp and outdoor ambient.    Adjust charge IF NECESSARY.

--- End quote ---

You mention fiddling...I don't play violin but do play accordion...does that help?  :tiphat:

Of course, I'm being facetious (silly) here.  :rofl:  After a bit of consideration, I think I'll leave the heat pump alone.

But, I will clean the coil and install the UV lamp. I need to find switched 120VAC in the air handler and tap into that for the UV power when the blower is running. Any thoughts?  :thankyou:

 :popcorn:

def:

--- Quote from: lesguns on February 14, 2013, 11:05:21 PM ---ground source is the best for heat pumps but real expensive. try 1500w infared heaters for xtra aux. just a thought.

--- End quote ---

I have been contemplating a ground source system should I ever build another house. I am now thinking about another house and a heated swimming pool, as well. Ground source would be good for heating the pool, as well.  ::)

Now, I have to find a way to balance the load between the pool, two houses, domestic hot water demands and the phases of the moon.  8)

I don't know if I can balance a variable load with the equipment that is currently available. I may have to design something myself and fabricate some purpose built valves to distribute coolant...more work to be done. I have plenty of real estate for the ground source heat exchange plumbing but have determined that moon phases need not be considered.   :)

And yes, your suggestion of some auxiliary infrared heaters is appropriate and appreciated.   :thanks:

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