Author Topic: Over head  (Read 1805 times)

Online Rick32k

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Over head
« on: December 12, 2012, 07:38:52 PM »
I fixed a fridge for someone, the overload relay capacitor was $15, the fan motor was $100. After $115 I barely had enough room for a decent profit. I only made $25 on the call. I find that this is a common problem. Any suggestions?

Offline Patricio

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Re: Over head
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2012, 07:44:42 PM »
Charge more
Great Old Fashion Hometown Service

Online Rick32k

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Re: Over head
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2012, 07:46:02 PM »
Then they'll just junk the machine and get a new one.

Offline domain

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Re: Over head
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 07:47:35 PM »
Charge more
X2. Charge enough to make it worth the effort and time. If that's not possible, its not economical to repair. :D

Online Rick32k

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Re: Over head
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2012, 07:50:30 PM »
Is there like an industry pricing list? Or is it based on each tech mostly? Whe do you guys get your parts whole sale? What parts do you keep on your trucks

Offline Patricio

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Re: Over head
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2012, 08:00:20 PM »
I learned long time ago, don't sell your self short.  Good customers don't mind paying a fair price for good work.  That job should have been $200 plus.  Only the cheap want it on the cheap.  Those will dish you in a heartbeat.  Be a professional, Expect a professional wage, don't be bashful, charge accordingly.
 Unless, your work is questionable in your eyes.
Great Old Fashion Hometown Service

Online Rick32k

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Re: Over head
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2012, 08:02:37 PM »
Good advice thanks! What parts do you keep on your truck.

Offline Patricio

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Re: Over head
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2012, 08:30:05 PM »
I am fortunate, I have 2 parts supply very close to my service area, otherwise I order online from Repair Clinic or Appliance Parts Pro.  They supply parts at a technicians price if you ask for the discount.   As far as what I carry in my vehicle, it comes to you as you you get experianced at the jobs you do.  Switches, water valves, ignitors, fuses, T-stats, ice makers, etc.

There's an appliance blue book for under $200 for price quidelines.  I deviate from it for the most part like 10% less cause of the economy I live in.  It stil a good wage if you manage your business expenses accordingly. 
Great Old Fashion Hometown Service

Offline john63

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Re: Over head
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2012, 09:21:57 PM »
Be a professional, Expect a professional wage, don't be bashful, charge accordingly.

****************

Took the words right out of my mouth :)
100% true.

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<<<There's an appliance blue book for under $200 for price quidelines.>>>

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A must have "tool".

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<<<It stil a good wage if you manage your business expenses accordingly.>>>

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That's an excellent point---and one that isn't discussed much anywhere.
Managing expenses is imperative.
Know your daily/weekly/monthly/quarterly/annual expenses---and profits.
Plan strategies based on these figures.
It can be a simple thing such as getting a gas card with low interest and/or cash back---if used at a specific retailer (BJs/Walmart/Costco etc...) This can save a few hundred dollars per year.










 








Offline BevTech

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Re: Over head
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2012, 08:55:28 PM »
All very good answers. IMO the #1 factor has to be you being paid for your work thereby charging competitive rates up against others. Your quality workmanship and customer focus will shine through and the customer will be likely to hire you again and recommend you to neighbours in the future. I believe a good tech must keep a good stock of the usual part suspects for the five majors on board or within an hours reach. If the tech has to constantly leave the customers equip down then well they will be less likely to hire you again. Another thing you can do while at customers locations is to up sell your services by asking if they might have any other concerns. You might be surprised how many folks have other appliance issues or concerns. I could go all day with this.
13 yr Certified Commercial Beverage Appliance Tech

 

Electrical connection question --Over-head electrical works

Started by willijimon

Replies: 1
Views: 1867
Last post March 04, 2009, 12:47:07 PM
by Repair-man