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Author Topic: Throwing caution to the wind  (Read 217 times)

Online RAH52

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Throwing caution to the wind
« on: October 20, 2012, 06:15:22 AM »
Sometimes I'm asked by a customer to look at a product that I've never had training on ,don't have a clue how to disassemble and have the potential of costing me big $$$ if I screw up because of the expensive nature of the item .These a usually brought to my attention as by the way while your here can you look at my so and so appliance .My many years in the business has taught me one thing ,if I haven't seen it by now I'm not going to train myself on their appliance .Most times I bail.

Offline JWWebster

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2012, 09:01:09 AM »
I have some peeps with that same philosophy, but instead of turning down the job they bring it to me. LOL
May the hinges of our friendship
        never grow rusty.

About the icons: The beer is tip link, if a tech saves ya some money buy em a 6 pack. The small green square=personal message. The green dot is a link to my web page on appliance repair and other general BS I love to post. The letter sends me email.
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Offline AJ

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2012, 09:14:10 AM »
Working for myself I can pick and choose what type of work I do.

When I worked for the man I did everything and anything. Such as with installs my boss would have me running water lines, electrical lines, installing electrical outlets for above the range microwaves and outlets for dishwashers, etc...

We would also install dryer venting for new installs. Drilling them 4 1/8 inch holes for venting could be a real pain some days.

When I worked for the man I also worked on vacuum cleaners, commercial coffee makers and some other light commercial work.

Would not mind knowing more HVAC, but I don't really care for working on the commercial stuff found in restaurants.

So it's nice to have the option to turn some calls down instead of just being told to go look at it.

Offline Patricio

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2012, 09:54:09 AM »
When I hung my shingle my 1st customer was a lawyer who had one of those massive cabinet, steamer dryers that was making a 'noise'.  As a green tech, of course i was apprehinsive, but I tackled the job.    Took me a while to fiqure how to break into it.  Got into I did, & found the noise was coming from the blower fan & a deflector metal.

Straightened the metal out, examined the rest of the unit to familiarize myself.  Been on a roll ever since.   Customer was extremely happy (probably because I only charged $50)   Bottom line it really boosted my confidence about unfamilar machines.  They all come apart if I work slow enough to figgure them out.
Great Old Fashion Hometown Service

Online RAH52

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2012, 11:03:07 AM »
I like AJ have the luxury of saying no thanks to a job .Years ago was different .I remember at times when you were taking something  apart ...thinking to yourself ,I wish I were somewhere else .

Offline Wedgeman55

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2012, 02:47:00 PM »
     I will tackle most anything once.   However,  once you determine certain things will give you a major headache,   I feel your better off laying off certain jobs.   For instance,  I don't want to do dishwasher installs anymore;.    Why? ...........  In the time it takes to do that job and the potential for headaches,  I can do 2 or 3 other jobs and make more money. Same goes for Double Oven installs.
 
     Certain other jobs - for instance a Maytag Neptune Top load machine,  I pass on.   Also pass on a GE monogram Refrigerator that has that freezing up problem in the drain tube.    Better off without the headache.   I used to do sealed system jobs many years ago,  but I'd rather not bother with them when I have plenty of other work.   
 
      NOW........... if your just starting out,  and you have lots of time on your hand,  then I would say it doesn't hurt to try to fix anything.    You can learn from these experiences.    I used to try anything.   It all depends how much work your getting.    I used to do plumbing,  run gas lines,  install fuse boxes,   electrical lines.    In the 70's,  (man, I'm old) I used to work on Oil furnaces even though I hated them.  But,  once I got a few customers,  everybody gave out my name.   
 
      SO......... in conclusion,  I am in favor of doing repairs on stuff you are comfortable with \ why bother with stuff that will raise your stress levers,  blood pressure and aggrevate the hell out of you?   
 
     
Commercial Laundry repair Tech and Installer  1973 to 1980
Service Manager / Technician Commercial Laundry repair company 1980 to 2002
Refrigeration - HVAC - Boiler School 1974-1976
Electronic School 1978-1979
Self Employed Appliance Repair Company 2002 to present

Offline JWWebster

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2012, 02:26:47 PM »
A younger person has a lot of tools at their disposal we never had, especially the internet. You can go on youtube and see how to fix most anything that breaks.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2012, 02:27:53 PM by JWWebster »
May the hinges of our friendship
        never grow rusty.

About the icons: The beer is tip link, if a tech saves ya some money buy em a 6 pack. The small green square=personal message. The green dot is a link to my web page on appliance repair and other general BS I love to post. The letter sends me email.
I love fan letters! LOL

Offline andersenappliance

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2012, 08:57:57 PM »
Wedgeman & JWWebster:

You guys have got my number.  Everything I see I "haven't been trained on."  I jumped into this feet first as a handyman.  The folks who gave me a start did so because they liked the service I provided as the owner of a cleaning business.  That, and the fact that most handymen are meth-heads who've been fired from every trade job and decide to go it on their own.

I started by promising that I wouldn't break anything, and if I thought I was over my head, I'd bow out - no charge.

Pretty soon, I was saying "I think its this, and, if so, I can fix it for this."

After constantly being right, and bidding cheaper than the experts, they just gave me the keys for turnovers.  "Get the house ready, and call us when your finished, or if there are any problems.

I kinda figured that it must not be worth anybody else's time to log on to the computer...

Anyway,  I'm doing stuff now that no one else will do (not can't do).  It's a small town, so there's not many options, but people call me for everything.  So far, by the Grace of God, I've been successful.

Now I've been in the appliance repair business on my own for a couple of years, and it is going well.  I'm getting ready to move to greener pastures, and just building experience vicariously through this and other forums.

I'm getting into circuit board repairs now too.

I know that many folks will warn me away, but it's worked out so far, and, so far, I'm covering all the bases.


Offline Wedgeman55

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2012, 02:16:20 AM »
Anderson,  Greener Pastures?   Bigger city or are you preparing to hit the mega-millions?  All kidding aside,  doesn't hurt to try anything your comfortable with.    Like JW says,   you can U=tube almost anything and get so much info from the internet.   

Back when I started,   in the early 70's,  you had a service manual and whatever you could pick from the brains of you fellow workers.     I was lucky,  my dad did appliance repair and television repairs for 35 years so he taught me alot.    You had to learn for yourself.   I had no cell phone,  no tech support for the most part,  you either figured it out or you didn't//  People who didn't figure it out didn't last long.   

Keep working and learning.    Every day is like going to school,  hopefully you come out at the end of the day with something new in you arsenal.   
Commercial Laundry repair Tech and Installer  1973 to 1980
Service Manager / Technician Commercial Laundry repair company 1980 to 2002
Refrigeration - HVAC - Boiler School 1974-1976
Electronic School 1978-1979
Self Employed Appliance Repair Company 2002 to present

Offline andersenappliance

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Re: Throwing caution to the wind
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2012, 05:24:34 PM »
I'm moving closer to the coast.  There is an area there with about twice the population as where I'm at currently, and there is no local appliance repair.  It is still a bit rural, but I think the population in 3 cities will add up to about 40k and I'll be right in the middle (About 30 mi diameter circle).  It won't get as hot as the central valley does.  No Lowes or Home Depot, nor any Big Box store closer than about 35 mi, either.

So I should do well with repairs and the used models I can sell.

I figure it is better to get your feet wet, then really establish yourself when you have more confidence & experience.  Mega-Millions is Plan B.   O0

 

Wake up this morning to a Beeping noise, my personal oven is throwing a code lol

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