Author Topic: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker  (Read 1143 times)

Offline williamigriffith

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Jul 2012
  • Posts: 3
Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« on: July 14, 2012, 08:57:17 AM »
Over the years I have solved several problems with this icemaker, which I might add, makes a lot of ice quickly.

The first problem was when I turned the water off and left the Icemaker arm in the on, down, position.  In this case the solenoid valve somehow stuck in the on position and flooded the icemaker when water pressure was restored.  I fixed this by tapping on the red and blue solenoid valves at the back bottom left corner, looking from the back, corner of the fridge.  You will have to remove a fiber cover to gain access.

The second problem occurred when the icemaker put water on the floor whenever the icemaker went through a fill cycle.  I removed the fiber cover and saw that the icemaker fill tube, it goes up the outside of the fridge, was cracked and leaking at the control valve.  A technician told me that it is not uncommon for the fill tubes to get brittle with age and heat.  When removing the screws to hold the solenoid valves, there are two together (red and blue), the water door fill line broke as well.  I had enough extra line to trim off the broken end of both, and reinstall.  I went hand tight on the nuts so as not to over tighten, and possibly break again.  This should be OK, as there should be not significant water pressure in these fill lines.  If you get confused, the door fill line is the large one, may have a small flow restrictor (mine did) and hooks to the right solenoid (forget red or blue), the icemaker fill goes to the left valve, and that tube is a little smaller in diameter.  My understanding is that both valves operate simultaneously to supply water to the icemaker, only the right hand one does to supply water to the door.  Thus, if you are getting door water, you know the right hand one is OK.  If these tubes break again, I will need to replace them.

Another common problem I have not had, freezing of the fill tube, can be read about elsewhere.  I have heard that a hair dryer is good for solving this.

In the past I was annoyed that this fridge ran all the time.  I have found out that it is supposed to.  Perhaps the compressor cycles, but the fan runs all the time, and apparently it is supposed to.

Offline RegUS_PatOff

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Dec 2007
  • Posts: 1410
  • Country: us
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2012, 09:19:49 AM »
... TPX24
... tapping on the red and blue solenoid valves
... there should be not significant water pressure in these fill lines. 
... both valves operate simultaneously to supply water to the icemaker
... fridge ran all the time.  I have found out that it is supposed to. 
1) there's over 150 different models, some with different parts
2) Water Valve may "stick" again
3) Valve output pressure is the same as Valve input pressure
4) not on the TPX24's
5) If the Fans are running all the time, the Compressor is running .. may have a sealed system problem
After leaving this Earth, "Do you want the smoking or non-smoking section?"

Offline williamigriffith

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Jul 2012
  • Posts: 3
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2012, 07:51:28 AM »
I appreciate the comments, at least someone read my post, but as far as I know, what I said was correct. 
1.  Of course there are many models, and I don't know which ones are as my own, but I imagine many are similar to mine, a TPX24 with water in the door and an icemaker is most likely the same or similar.
2.  Of course a stuck valve could stick again.  I thought that the cause was probably due to the icemaker being turned on while there was no water pressure on the input side.  If this is a common occurrence, then others might want to know, instead of replacing the solenoid assembly, which would entail replacing both, I imagine that is how these parts are replaced.  In any case, you have to gain access  to "tap" on a solenoid valve, so why not try that first?
3.  When the icemaker calls for water, it freely runs into the icemaker unobstructed and the only resistance is the size of the hose and the few feet of head to rise to the icemaker.  Clearly the fill pressure at the solenoid connection is low, otherwise water would be gushing into the icemaker and filling it in much less time, I imagine there is a restricting orifice somewhere in the assembly, or some other pressure/flow regulation.  That said, the supply pressure, which needs to be quite tight to not leak, is much higher than the delivery pressure coming out of the solenoid control valve.  As there should never be any restriction in this line, the pressure at the valve should never be very high to achieve the necessary flow.  Regardless of all of that, after hand tightening these valve outputs for the fill lines, neither leaks, so that may be a good practice.  By the way, these nuts are not sized for an open end wrench, perhaps to discourage over tightening.
4.  I read on line that both valves needed to be open for the icemaker to receive water.  These quotations, forget their origin, said you would not get icemaker water if there was no door water.  An appliance parts guy told me same thing, when I was debugging the problem.  I imagine it is true on most, if not all GE fridges that have water in the door and an icemaker, but I have no way to know for sure.  In summary, if you have door water and no water to the icemaker, there is either a problem with the fill line, or icing of the fill line, or a problem with the icemaker solenoid.
5.  I believe it was the GE website said that this model runs all the time, if not that, something that was very authentic and believable.  I was surprised by this, and perhaps it is only air circulation and not necessarily the compressor, as it would surely over cool when room air is cool.  Other than the icemaker, this fridge has worked fine for fourteen years running all the time (or nearly so), keeping things frozen, keeping fresh things at the right temp, and making ice.  At this point I would not argue that it is not supposed to do that.  It would have died long ago, if that was not the intent to run continuously or nearly so.  Just checked the manual that comes with it, it only says that it is designed to run for "long periods".  It obviously is designed to have a nearly continuous duty cycle.

Enough said!

Offline RegUS_PatOff

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Dec 2007
  • Posts: 1410
  • Country: us
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2012, 08:26:01 AM »
... as far as I know, what I said was correct. 
... Of course there are many models, and I don't know which ones are as my own,
... Clearly the fill pressure at the solenoid connection is low ... the pressure at the valve should never be very high to achieve the necessary flow. 
... I read on line that both valves needed to be open for the icemaker to receive water.... An appliance parts guy told me same thing
... I believe it was the GE website said that this model runs all the time, if not that, something that was very authentic and believable.
... this fridge has worked fine for fourteen years running all the time
1) I could agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong
2) there's over 150 versions of the TPX24
4) pressure stays the same ...pressure and volume are two different things
5) not on the TPX24's
6) never heard of that for any Fridge
7) with an excessive electrical bill
good luck
After leaving this Earth, "Do you want the smoking or non-smoking section?"

Offline williamigriffith

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Jul 2012
  • Posts: 3
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2012, 11:42:36 AM »
Regarding said refrigerator,
perhaps other people are wrong, and one valve feeds the icemaker and one feeds the door.  That is how I would have designed it, and it may be the case here, and as I recall, I believe the house water feed line was connected between the two solenoids, suggesting just that.  I was influenced by what others told me, or what others wrote.  I would not say I knew for sure how the feed lines work without taking it apart.  It could well be that a working door water line is unrelated to the icemaker and vice versa.

Regarding the TPX24, perhaps they're all different and don't share a single part, that would surprise me, but I don't know.  I do know that all manufacturers share as many parts as they can hope to get by with.  Fewer unique parts normally equates to a lower cost.  New parts are introduced as suppliers change, performance can be increased, cost can be lowered, etc.  My precise model is TPX24 PRYEWW, if anybody cares. 

Regarding the pressure, first of all, as there is flow through the valve, the pressure will never be the same on both sides, as there is a loss of head, manifested as a pressure loss, across the valve when flow occurs.  That is undeniable fact.  What I don't know is whether they introduced a pressure loss, that is restricting the flow intentionally, across the valve.  If you take a garden hose and hook it to a spigot and crack the valve, the pressure at the non hose side stays the same and the pressure on the hose end is atmospheric.  As you progressively open the valve the pressures approach each other, but they are never exactly the same.  My thinking was that the flow to the icemaker was such that some restriction other than the hose's natural resistance was present.  However, I don't know that to be the case.  In any case, as I already said, there was no leak with hand tightening, so that may be a good idea, but certainly not if it starts leaking later.

I never heard of any fridge running all of the time either, but the manual does say that it runs for long periods and I did read what I did in one place that says the TPX24 runs continuously, maybe they meant nearly continuously.  When I first got this refrigerator I was put out by how much it ran, but it is always at the right internal temp, makes ice, etc.  If it were low on freon or performing significantly off, it would not do so for fourteen years, would it?  As far as I know, my electrical bill seems normal.  I have been listening to it the last several days, and it has not shut off, and I have never liked that aspect.

Finally, if anybody ever reads this conversation besides the two of us, they will probably know something new.  I only hope it will be worth it in a few cases.

Nothing more to say on any of the above.

Offline JWWebster

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Jan 2008
  • Posts: 8780
  • Country: us
  • SublimeMasterJW
    • Buy me a beer through paypal
    • JW's Sublime Appliance Advice
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2012, 12:56:29 PM »
I used to sell a water valve WR57X10051 for your model at the appliance parts store I worked at before I retired. The valve has 2 solenoids. The smaller line goes to the ice maker. The larger supply's the water in the door. Neither of which work together and are on 2 different circuits. The ice maker solenoid is operated by the ice maker itself. When the ice is harvested the ice maker powers the water valve and fills it. The fill spout freezing is caused by a leaky water valve dripping and forming a stalagmite in the fill spout. The only way to fix it is to replace the water valve. The larger line is powered up by the lever you push to get water in your glass.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 12:58:54 PM by JWWebster »
May the hinges of our friendship
        never grow rusty.

About the icons: The beer is tip link, if a tech saves ya some money buy em a 6 pack. The small green square=personal message. The green dot is a link to my web page on appliance repair and other general BS I love to post. The letter sends me email.
I love fan letters! LOL

Offline haroldsappliance

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Nov 2011
  • Posts: 612
  • Country: us
    • Appliance repair
Re: Problems solved with GE TPX24 ice maker
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2012, 02:57:56 PM »
Replacing the water valve is a lot cheaper than your entire home being flooded. Low water pressure can cause this problem, but is very rare. Replace the valve.  Anytime I see a fill tube full of ice I will always replace the valve. It's a very inexpensive insurance policy.

 

Kenmore 106.52552100 ice maker problems

Started by philhyde

Replies: 8
Views: 8741
Last post August 16, 2007, 07:33:28 AM
by philhyde
Kenmore SxS Model 106.56563400 Ice Maker Problems

Started by Kman

Replies: 4
Views: 4854
Last post September 07, 2007, 12:45:10 PM
by Pegi
KitchenAid Rerigerator Ice Maker Problems

Started by sneakers

Replies: 4
Views: 5514
Last post January 27, 2009, 01:17:00 PM
by sneakers
Kenmore side-by-side fridge having several different ice maker problems...

Started by jade7597

Replies: 2
Views: 1385
Last post August 20, 2010, 10:26:11 PM
by tgoods
Whirlpool ice maker problems

Started by phoenix79

Replies: 16
Views: 9033
Last post September 26, 2010, 01:02:30 PM
by iliiinieis
whirlpool gold gs6nbexrs01, problems with ice maker, etc

Started by alcat649

Replies: 0
Views: 222
Last post January 09, 2014, 10:47:00 AM
by alcat649